Coronavirus Testing
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Home > SpecialPages > COVID-19 Information > COVID-19 Testing Information

City of Jacksonville COVID-19 Testing Information

City of Jacksonville COVID-19 Testing Information
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: Map of Locations | Available Testing | FAQTesting Data | Submit a Testing Location


The health and safety of Jacksonville citizens is of our utmost concern. We want to ensure that residents have the latest information regarding the virus and its current impacts. This page contains the most up-to-date information regarding COVID-19 Testing in Jacksonville, including recent counts of tests administered by testing location and a map of the test sites.  

It is important to remember that risk of getting the disease is directly related to exposure to the virus.

Read the City's Frequently Asked Questions and Answers regarding COVID-19.

For City of Jacksonville Recovery Resources, please visit the following link: coj.net/recoveryresources 

Map of Locations

Available Testing

No Matching Search Results Found
Walk-In
Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m. - 6 p.m.
Sat. 10 a.m - 2 p.m
Walk-In or By Appointment
7 a.m. – 7 p.m.
Sat 9am-6pm; Sun 9am-4pm
Walk-In or By Appointment
7 a.m. – 7 p.m.
Sat 9am-6pm; Sun 9am-4pm
Walk-In or By Appointment
7 a.m. – 7 p.m
Sat 9am-6pm; Sun 9am-4pm
By Appointment Only
904-778-9180
Mon-Fri 8a.m. - 8p.m.
Sat & Sun 8a.m. - 5p.m.
By Appointment Only
904-900-1717
Mon-Fri 8a.m. - 8p.m.
Sat & Sun 8a.m. - 5p.m.
Walk-In or By Appointment
(904) 743-2466
8 a.m. - 8 p.m. daily
Walk-In or By Appointment
(904) 642-0337
8 a.m. - 8 p.m. daily
Walk-In or By Appointment
(904) 854-1700
8a.m - 8.p.m. Daily
Walk-In or By Appointment
(904) 288-0277
8a.m - 8.p.m. Daily
Walk-In or By Appointment
(904) 241-0117
8a.m - 8.p.m. Daily
Walk-In or By Appointment
(904) 543-3677
8a.m - 8.p.m. Daily
Walk-In or By Appointment
(904) 757-2008
8a.m - 8.p.m. Daily
Walk-In or By Appointment
(904) 213-0600
8a.m - 8.p.m. Daily
Walk-In or By Appointment
(904) 854-1730
8a.m - 8.p.m. Daily
Walk-In or By Appointment
(904) 248-3910
8a.m - 8.p.m. Daily
Walk-In or By Appointment
(904) 378-0121
8a.m - 8.p.m. Daily
904-854-7911
Mon-Fri 9 a.m. - 7 p.m.
Sat & Sun 9 a.m. - 4 p.m.
By Appointment Only
904-253-1850
Mon-Sun 8a.m - 7.p.m.
Sat & Sun 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.

Frequently Asked Questions

Should I be tested?
Maybe; not everyone needs to be tested for COVID-19. Most people will have mild illness and can recover at home without medical care and may not need to be tested. If you have symptoms of COVID-19 ( link to l) and want to get tested, call your healthcare provider first. Your healthcare provider will determine if you need to be tested for COVID-19 and might consult with your local health department if needed. CDC has guidance for who should be tested, but decisions about testing are made by state and local health departments and healthcare providers.
What exactly is the test for COVID-19?

There are different tests available for COVID-19: tests for current infection (viral tests) and tests for past infection (antibody tests.) The COVID-19 test being used depends on which test the clinician ordered and the laboratory doing the test.

Viral Tests use swabs or a nasal wash to collect samples from a person’s upper respiratory tract (nose or throat) for the presence of genetic material from SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. Viral tests are used to diagnose current infection with COVID-19.

Antibody Tests check your blood for antibodies, which may show if you had a previous infection. The antibody test is NOT intended as a diagnostic test. An antibody test may not be able to show if you have a current infection, because it can take 1-3 weeks after infection to make antibodies. We do not know yet if having antibodies to the virus can protect someone from getting infected with the virus again, or how long that protection might last.

How can I get tested for a current infection (viral test) and what does my test mean?

If you have symptoms of COVID-19 and want to get tested, call your healthcare provider first. You can also visit one of the testing sites listed on this page. Testing criteria is different for each site, so please review location information carefully to determine if you qualify. If you test positive for COVID-19, know what protective steps to take if you are sick or caring for someone

If you test negative for COVID-19, you probably were not infected at the time your sample was collected. However, that does not mean you will not get sick. The test result only means that you did not have COVID-19 at the time of testing. You might test negative if the sample was collected early in your infection and test positive later during your illness. You could also be exposed to COVID-19 after the test and get infected then. This means you could still spread the

virus. If you develop symptoms later, you might need another test to determine if you are infected with the virus that causes COVID-19. For more information about viral tests, see the CDC’s page on Test for Current Infection.

How can I get tested for a past infection (antibody test) and what does my test mean?

Antibody tests for COVID-19 are available through healthcare providers and laboratories. Check with your healthcare provider to see if they offer antibody tests and whether you should get one. A select few of the testing sites listed on this page offer antibody testing. Testing criteria is different for each site, so please review location information carefully to determine if you qualify.

A positive test result shows you might have antibodies from an infection with the virus that causes COVID-19. However, there is a chance a positive result means that you have antibodies from an infection with a virus from the same family of viruses (called coronaviruses), such as the one that causes the common cold.

Having antibodies to the virus that causes COVID-19 might provide protection from getting infected with the virus again. If it does, we do not know how much protection the antibodies might provide or how long this protection might last. You should continue to protect yourself and others since you could get infected with the virus again.

If you test negative, you might not have ever had COVID-19. Talk with your healthcare provider about your test result and the type of test you took to understand what your result means.

Regardless of whether you test positive or negative, the results do not confirm whether or not you are able to spread the virus that causes COVID-19. If you want more information about antibody tests, see Test for Past Infection.

Can someone test negative and later test positive on a viral test for COVID-19?

Yes, this is possible. If you test negative for COVID-19, you probably were not infected at the time your sample was collected. However, that does not mean you will not get sick. It is possible that you were very early in your infection when your sample was collected and that you could test positive later. Or you could be exposed later and then develop illness. In other

words, a negative test result does not mean you won’t get sick later. This means you could still spread the virus.

What happens if I test positive?

If you get a positive COVID-19 diagnosis or are suspected to have COVID-19, follow these steps to prevent the disease spreading and protect your community:

  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick;
  • Stay home when you are sick and avoid contact with persons in poor health;
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth with unwashed hands;
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then dispose of the tissue;
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after using the bathroom, before eating, after blowing your nose, coughing or sneezing;
    • If soap and water are not readily available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol. Always wash hands with soap and water if hands are visibly dirty; and
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces using a regular household cleaning spray or wipe.
After testing, how will I get my test results?

You will get your test results from the healthcare professional or facility that collected your specimens. Ask your healthcare provider, when they collect your specimen, what the best way to get your results is. Most clinics and health care professionals are providing results by telephone. Documentation explaining how to obtain your results will be provided at any City of Jacksonville or state sponsored drive-through and walk-up testing site.

While the DOH does receive COVID-19 test results from private labs, including both positive and negative results, the best way to know how you will get your results is to talk with your healthcare provider.

How long do results take?
It depends on the type of test, and where the sample is sent for testing. The results can come back in as quickly as 10 minutes for antibody tests or as long as several days for active viral tests, as some of the labs that are processing the test have a backlog and can take longer. This will depend on where your healthcare provider sends the test for analysis

Testing Data

Testing data will be provided for City-operated testing locations and Duval County totals from the Florida Department of Health every Monday and Thursday by 12 p.m. For information for other testing locations, please contact the organizer(s) for that specific location. For the most current data from the Florida Department of Health, view Florida's COVID-19 Data & Surveillance Dashboard.

Duval County Testing Data

Florida Department of Health Data

Total COVID-19 Tests in Duval County 201,214
Overall Percent Positive 11%

Testing Locations

Cumulative Total

Legends Center (5130 Soutel Dr.) - COVID-19 Diagnostic Testing 16,190
*This table was last updated on August 4, 2020 at 1:00 p.m.
 
 
CLOSED - Henry Brown Kooker Park (1400 E. 20th St.) 1,525 (FINAL)
CLOSED - Prime Osborn Convention Center (1000 Water St.) 3,761 (FINAL)
CLOSED - Lot J (1 TIAA Bank Field Dr.) - COVID-19 Diagnostic Testing 43,535 (FINAL)
CLOSED - Lot J (1 TIAA Bank Field Dr.) - COVID-19 Antibody Testing 7,127 (FINAL)

Submit a Testing Location

Complete the COVID-19 Testing Site Form to submit your location for inclusion on this page.
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